The Brick Phone: Coming to a City Near You

Fahrenheit Marketing
Fahrenheit Marketing in Design

The 80s were truly spectacular years for American pop culture. Madonna was still the edgiest thing around. The Star Wars universe hadn’t been visited by Hayden Christenson or Jar Jar Binks. Milli Vanilli was still considered a legitimate musical group.

The 80s were also the decade of the brick mobile phone. The brick phone was one of the first major mobile devices available to consumers. It made prominent appearances in shows such as Saved by the Bell and movies like Wall Street before being replaced by smaller devices and eventually smartphones.

But the brick phone isn’t dead—not quite. New York designer Brad Helmick is trying to resurrect the brick phone via the 1980s Brick Phone project on Indiegogo.com.

However, Helmick’s “brick phone” isn’t really a phone at all. It won’t be able to make or receive calls on its own but functions more like a stylish Bluetooth device that connects to your Android or iPhone. The brick phone will charge via a mini USB and gets up to 10 hours of battery life.

So what’s the appeal of the new brick phone?  Nostalgia mostly. And the desire to be more rad than the rest of your friends. Other than that it’s a bulky hunk of plastic that most people were glad to get rid of 20 years ago.

The brick phone isn’t the first bit of old technology to be resurrected for style purposes. Cassette tapes are coming back into vogue for a retro music experience. And a number of new musical groups have released 45s of their albums alongside iTunes recordings and CDs. At the same time, however, no one is really bothering to reboot Macintosh Pluses or floppy disk drives. Some things, it seems, are better left to the past.

If you’re curious about the new brick phone, or would like a brick phone of your own, you can find Helmick’s project on Indiegogo.com. If he receives enough funding he promises to ship out brick phones to anyone who donates $45 or more.

Here at Fahrenheit Marketing, we don’t plan on ordering any brick phones in the near future. At the same time, we can’t help but admire Helmick’s very original idea and can’t wait for brick phones to start popping up on the streets of Austin. In the meantime, we’ll keep developing stellar apps for the smart phones of our own decade. If you’d like to learn more about our mobile app development, contact Fahrenheit Marketing today.


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